qasaweh:

cosmic-music0:

 


Little do you know…you opened a new window for the wind, the sun, hope, and freedom

 


Don’t reblog my picture without the fucking caption. This isn’t a metaphor for your basic suburban life and your trivial teenage problems. This was written by revolutionaries fighting and struggling for freedom - respect that.

qasaweh:

cosmic-music0:

 

Little do you know…you opened a new window for the wind, the sun, hope, and freedom

 

Don’t reblog my picture without the fucking caption. This isn’t a metaphor for your basic suburban life and your trivial teenage problems. This was written by revolutionaries fighting and struggling for freedom - respect that.

2,631 notes

A Moment of Innocence, Mohsen Makhmalbaf

51,227 notes

…religious faith obscures uncertainty where uncertainty manifestly exists, allowing the unknown, the implausible, and the patently false to achieve primacy over the facts.
Sam Harris, The End of Faith, P. 165 (via blackestdespondency)

26 notes

It is time we recognized that belief is not a private matter; it has never been merely private. In fact, beliefs are scarcely more private than actions are, for every belief is a fount of action in potentia. The belief that it will rain puts an umbrella in the hand of every man or woman who owns one. It should be easy enough to see that belief in the full efficacy of prayer, for instance, becomes an emphatically public concern the moment it is actually put into practice: the moment a surgeon lays aside his worldly instruments and attempts to suture his patients with prayer, or a pilot tries to land a passenger jet with nothing but repetitions of the word “Hallelujah” applied to the controls, we are swiftly delivered from the provinces of private faith to those of a criminal court.
Sam Harris, The End of Faith, P. 44 (via blackestdespondency)

9 notes

“We want to make life permanent, but in doing so we go against nature, and there lies our pain. Only the mind which is always moving, without resting places and fixed ideas, can be in tune with life and therefore joyful.” 
― Jiddu Krishnamurti

1 note

In short, Humanism is being good without god. It is above all an affirmation of the greatest common values we human beings have: the desire to life with dignity, to be “good.” But humanism is also a warning that we cannot afford to wait until tomorrow of until the next life to be good, because today— the short journey we get from birth to death, womb to tomb— is all we have. Humanism rejects dependence on faith, the supernatural, divine texts, resurrection, reincarnation, or anything else which we have no evidence. To put it another way, Humanists believe in life before death.
Good without god- Greg M. Epstein (via recovery-through-fitness)

352 notes

A monk asked an ancient worthy, “What is the Way?”

He replied, “The normal mind is the Way.”

Yagyu Munenori (via nucleogenesis)

(Source: curiouscrook)

19 notes

Language is courage: the ability to conceive a thought, to speak it, and by doing so to make it true.

454 notes

I find a purposeless universe to be far more inspiring and far less bleak, because it means that the meaning in our lives is the meaning we create. It is not imposed on us by some other entity…The meaning in my life is the meaning I make, and the quality of my life is the quality of my actions.

Seeing myself as an insignificant being in a purposeless universe inspires me to say: I am here for this little bit of time, I should make the most of my existence and make meaning in my life by the meaning of my actions. I find it far more humble to believe that than to assume that the universe was made for me.

Lawrence Krauss  (via scientificpunkrock)

301 notes